Watch: Barrett can't name all five freedoms of the First Amendment

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If confirmed, Barrett would be asked to make rulings based on the U.S. Constitution, including the First Amendment.

During her Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Judge Amy Coney Barrett was unable to list the five freedoms protected by the First Amendment.

"What are the five freedoms of the First Amendment?" Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE) asked the nominee.

"Speech, religion, press, assembly. Speech, press, religion, assembly, I don't know, what am I missing?" she responded. Sasse explained to her that she had failed to mention the right to protest.

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The First Amendment, which as part of the Bill of Rights was added to the U.S. Constitution in 1791, defines freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Barrett's failure to answer came as Sasse was discussing with Barrett that the Bill of Rights enumerates rights to U.S. citizens, and that Barrett has taught students how the Constitution works in her previous role as a law professor.

Senate Republicans have used the confirmation hearing to repeatedly offer up easy questions for Barrett to answer.

From an Oct. 14 hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee:

SEN. BEN SASSE: What are the five freedoms of the First Amendment?

 

AMY CONEY BARRETT: Speech, religion, press, assembly. Speech, press, religion, assembly, I don't know, what am I missing?

 

SASSE: Redress, or protest.

 

BARRETT: OK.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.