These conservatives funded the racist QAnon fan who just won a House nomination

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Republicans like Reps. Jim Jordan and Andy Biggs, as well as White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, have given thousands to Marjorie Taylor Greene.

Marjorie Taylor Greene — a Republican who embraces the widely debunked and dangerous QAnon conspiracy theory that the FBI has labeled as a domestic terrorism threat — won a runoff election for Georgia's 14th District on Tuesday night.

With the district a deep red stronghold, Greene is all but guaranteed a spot in the House of Representatives now.

With nearly all precincts reporting, Greene won 57.2% to 42.8% of the vote over conservative physician John Cowan.

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Greene holds numerous anti-Semitic, racist, and Islamophobic views. According to videos obtained by Politico, she has said that Muslim people do not "belong in our government," equated anti-racism protesters with Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members, claimed there is no systemic racism in the United States because "slavery is over," and suggested that Black people are just "lazy" and make "bad choices."

Her support for the baseless QAnon conspiracy, which claims a cabal of powerful politicians — most of them Democrats — are running an international child trafficking ring and working to undermine Donald Trump, has also alarmed onlookers.

Greene once posted a YouTube video praising the supposed faceless leader of the QAnon conspiracy movement, saying, "Q is a patriot," and claiming "there's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take this global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles out, and I think we have the president to do it."

In her victory speech Tuesday night, Greene bragged about her primary campaign, saying, "The Republican establishment was against me. The D.C. swamp is against me. And the lying fake news media hates my guts. It's a badge of honor."

She also attacked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as "anti-American" and a "bitch."

But contrary to her claims, much of the Republican establishment backed her during her primary bid, or at least refused to back her opponent.

Greene was in fact bankrolled by several prominent conservatives. According to Federal Election Commission filings, she received tens of thousands of dollars from high profile Republicans and conservative political action committees.

Her donors include:

The House Freedom Caucus

A group of the most right-wing Republicans in the House sent Greene several contributions during the course of her campaign. In total, the House Freedom Fund PAC raised and funneled at least $26,052 in donations between last December and June 30. The group did not respond to an inquiry for this story, but praised her as "a proven leader and an outspoken defender of liberty who will fight for limited government and economic freedom in Washington" on its website.

Koch Industries

The petrochemical company, co-owned by conservative mega-donor Charles Koch, contributed $5,000 to Greene in June through its corporate PAC.

A Koch spokesperson said in an email Thursday that the company no longer supports Greene's campaign. They noted that "in June, upon learning of Ms. Greene’s past comments, KOCHPAC immediately requested a refund of its contribution."

"We said at the time that we do not condone such harmful and divisive rhetoric," they added.

Citizens United

The conservative group, best known for its landmark lawsuit challenging campaign finance rules, is run by Donald Trump deputy 2016 campaign manager David Bossie. The Citizens United Political Victory Fund PAC contributed $2,000 to Greene in April. The group did not respond to an inquiry for this story.

Rep. Jim Jordan

Jordan (R-OH) is a seventh-term U.S. representative and the top minority party member of the House Judiciary Committee. His campaign contributed $2,000 to Greene in April. Jordan did not respond to an inquiry for this story.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows

After service nearly four terms as a Republican U.S. representative from North Carolina, Meadows resigned his seat on March 30 to join the Trump administration. His now-shuttered Your Voice Counts leadership PAC sent $2,000 to Greene in late March, weeks after Trump named him as the incoming White House chief of staff.

Rep. Andy Biggs

Biggs (R-AZ) is a second-term congressman and chair of the House Freedom Caucus. His campaign contributed $1,000 to Greene in June. Biggs did not respond to an inquiry for this story.

While a spokesperson for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told The New York Times in June that Greene's comments were "appalling," McCarthy (R-CA) stayed neutral in Tuesday's runoff. His spokesperson told Politico on Sunday that he and Greene have "a good and productive relationship."

Greene will now face Kevin Van Ausdale, a financial technology industry worker, in November for retiring Rep. Tom Graves' open seat. According to the Cook Political Report, the deeply red district is 27 points more Republican than the nation as a whole.

A spokesperson for Greene's campaign did not respond to an inquiry for this story.

This article was updated with comment from Koch Industries.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.